Posts Tagged ‘crafty’

DIY Bunny Ears Flower Crown

Monday, March 7th, 2016

bunny ears flower crown headband-12

I got everyone’s Easter outfits last week. I’m not saying it’s super important to Jesus if the kids show up to church in coordinating spring finery, but if it was MY rise from the dead I’d definitely appreciate the effort. It just doesn’t feel like Easter in New England without everyone in pastel clothing and ruffle socks shivering under their winter coats.

easter throwback

Photo taken indoors, because it was probably snowing outside. I have both of those dresses upstairs in Caroline’s vintage dress collection.

While I did decide to forego forcing a hat on Lincoln, I managed to find one for Evan I expect will be worn daily almost all summer. I feel like the fact that he loves straw fedoras means I’m not completely screwing up this parenting thing. Caroline is still debating her sartorial options right now – the availability of Easter bonnets in the $1 section of Target makes it quite the decision – but I thought I might add an option and combine a couple of her favorites into one thing: A bunny ears flower crown headband.

  bunny ears flower crown headband-15

I got all my supplies at Michael’s Crafts and spent about $40 total, but that number is really high because I had to replace my missing glue gun. If you keep better track of your’s than I do of mine you should be able to get out of the craft store for under $20 and the supplies to make 8+ headbands. You could definitely get the same supplies at Joann or A.C. Moore.

DIY bunny ears flower crown headband

-Plastic Headbands (I found them with the party favors)
– Silver spray paint
– Fake flowers
– Glue gun
– Scissors
– Pipe cleaners
– Florist wire (I didn’t end up using it, but it was a pipe cleaner alternative in case they were too short)

I really lucked out with these headbands. I was looking for plain, one band plastic but these were even more perfect. Don’t go too thin or you won’t have enough space to glue down the flowers very well. These had holes that made attaching the pipe cleaner ears a piece of cake.

DIY bunny ears flower crown headband-2

DIY bunny ears flower crown headband-3

To make the ears, I just folded a pipe cleaner in half and creased it to make a point, then laced the ends through the headband. Then I twisted each ear around twice to secure it. I knew I’d be glue a bunch of flowers over them, so I didn’t add any glue just for the pipe cleaners. For the non-flower version, a dab wouldn’t hurt.

Then I chopped up the flowers into more manageable pieces. I kept some as stems to make a base and made some single flowers. I also pulled out a bunch of the leaves to mix and match among the flowers.

DIY bunny ears flower crown headband-4

DIY bunny ears flower crown headband-5

The glue held surprisingly well. I burned my fingers a few times holding the flowers on while it dried but nothing tragic. I put a few bigger flowers up near the ears on each crown, but mostly did the smaller flowers.

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Evan requested a sparkly silver pair for himself, so I spray painted a couple of the headbands silver and used the sparkly silver pipecleaners.

DIY bunny ears flower crown headband-7

This was my final bunny ears flower crown (and non flower crown) collection after about 90 minutes:

DIY bunny ears flower crown headband-23

All three flower crowns match Caroline’s new Easter dress, so she’s going to have a hard time choosing. I guess we’ll just have to plan a few spring-themed photoshoots so she gets a chance to wear all of them. Today, Linc just really wanted to get in on the action.

bunny ears flower crown headband-11

bunny ears flower crown headband-13

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bunny ears flower crown headband-18

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bunny ears flower crown headband-20

bunny ears flower crown headband-22

That wasn’t really much of a how-to¬†because bunny ears flower crowns are really easy. The good part is hot glue is cheap and pipe cleaners bend, so even if Linc insists on grabbing them we can repair any missing flowers and reshape the ears. I recommend leaving an inch or so of headband at the bottom bare so the plastic parts of the flowers don’t poke anyone where it really hurts. Other than that it’s all personal decisions. A single color flower would look very chic – like all white or all peach. If you wanted bigger ears you could use the fuzzy floral wire and then you could get away with bigger flowers for a grown up. I should have bought more greenery to do a boy-friendly version (Evan vetoed the flowers, even though I tried) besides just the plain ones. But overall, I love how they came out. It’s so rare I have a crafty vision these days, it was wonderful to get a chance to be creative.

Let me know if you make any, I’d love to see pictures!!

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How To Make Robot Shaped Crayons

Saturday, July 28th, 2012

This is an easy tutorial for robot shaped crayons only because we were having a robot-themed birthday. It’s really for any kind of shaped crayons – the possibilities are endless. All you need is a few boxes of regular crayons, a silicone mold and an oven.

Step 1: Peel all the wrappers off the crayons. It’s tedious, but put on a movie, grab a glass of wine and get to work.

Step 2: Break the crayons into pieces. For the 1 inch molds we broke each crayon into 3 or 4 pieces.

Step 3: Put broken pieces directly into the silicone mold.

Step 4: Put the mold in an oven or toaster oven set at 350 degrees for approximately 5-7 minutes, or until the wax has melted.

Step 5: Carefully transfer the mold to a shallow dish filled with ice water. Once the wax cools and hardens, pop out the crayons and repeat!

how to make robot shaped crayons in a silicone mold

how to make robot shaped crayons in a silicone mold

how to make robot shaped crayons in a silicone mold

how to make robot shaped crayons in a silicone mold

Lots of colors! Erin made a whole rainbow – each kid got at least 8 crayons.

Tips:

  • We were looking for a way to melt the wax to pour into the molds when I suggested just melting the wax IN the mold. It worked perfectly, and all the details on the crayons showed up really well.
  • This is the silicone robot mold we used for the crayons. It’s technically for chocolate, but any silicone mold would work for crayons.
  • Wax DOES burn, so keep an eye on your crayons and don’t try to rush them by turning the oven up too high.
  • If you set your mold on a piece of tin foil (see below) the foil cools almost instantly and it’s easy to transfer to the cold water without tipping or sloshing the wax.
  • We only filled the molds about half way – it kept the crayons easy for little hands to grab.

how to make robot shaped crayons in a silicone mold

how to make robot shaped crayons in a silicone mold

Crayons in action!

Robot birthday post coming soon!

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TuTu Too

Thursday, July 12th, 2012

My second most popular post ever is the totally easy, no-sew baby tutu I made for Caroline’s monthday photos during her first year. (Also, ermahgah guys, look at TEENY TINY CAROLINE in that tutu tutorial. I can’t even. I think I need another baby.*) If I had known how much the internet loved tutu tutorials I might have made it slightly less…sarcastic. But in the long run 99% of people seem to have found it helpful rather than rage-inducing. And may I suggest that if a tutu tutorial makes you really, really angry perhaps it is time to reexamine your life?

Anyways, since both Caroline and Evan have beat the crap out of that tutu for the last 18 months, I thought I’d add some “how has it held up?” photos to the old post and publish them here too so my mom doesn’t miss them. The answer is: Pretty well!

easy no-sew baby tutu tutorial

easy no-sew baby tutu tutorial

Tulle has a tendency to attract dog hair/lint/fuzz/every single crumb within 100 yards so looking back, white might not have been the best option. But it’s also pretty easy to brush off and/or lint roll and/or spray with a water bottle and shake out.

easy no-sew baby tutu tutorial

The tulle has gotten pretty tangled from being so well loved (and also stored bunched up in a corner) but can be smoothed out if I comb through it with my fingers. Although the sort of bunchy look isn’t really a bad thing – I feel like it really fits Caroline’s personality. Her nickname is Little Mess. Plus the whole “floating on a cloud” look is why I like baby tutus.

easy no-sew baby tutu tutorial

easy no-sew baby tutu tutorial

The ribbon waist was a really great idea, since she still fits in it easily. Even though Caroline is still tiny peanut munchkin toddler, Evan has definitely gotten bigger and the tutu still fits him (although her wouldn’t agree to post for pictures). And it’s easy to slide the tulle knots around to make it even.

easy no-sew baby tutu tutorial

Have I talked you into making a tutu (or another tutu) yet? Have you seen through my admittedly extremely weak premise and ignored this whole post in favor of just going “Awwww” over Caroline in a tutu photos? Either way, BOTH things can be done if you check out the tutorial here:

easy no-sew baby tutu tutorial

*Yeah, I said it. Gimme until after BlogHer, OK? Also, please ignore the giant booboo on Caroline’s head – she got a face rug burn at Target (I don’t even). Maybe I should wrap her in bubblewrap before I consider having another.

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Caroline’s First Birthday: Good Ideas

Friday, December 16th, 2011

This feels a little bit self congratulatory (especially since the party hasn’t even HAPPENED yet, so I have no proof these things actually WERE good ideas) but I am pretty excited about some of the stuff I’ve put together. This is the 4th party I’ve thrown since I discovered how much I LOVE hosting, and I’m finally getting the hang of it. And by “getting the hang of it” I mean “not spending a zillion dollars on unnecessary crap” and “make sure the guests have fun instead of just making the pictures look good”. So here are a few of the details I think are worth explaining a little more in depth than the coming soon post-party picture post.

DIY lace paper

A fancy hole punch can make regular paper look expensive. I bought this Martha Stewart edge punch at Michael’s with a 50% off coupon I tore out of a magazine. I’ve had it in a drawer for months and has started to think it was a dumb purchase, but it ended up being PERFECT for Caroline’s invitations. Then I carried the pattern over to the signs for the cocoa bar, food labels, cocktail recipes and the favor bags. One $10 box of blank invites and one package of white cardstock was the only other cost. There are tons of patterns that would be cute for other party themes, but the lace worked nicely with my snowflake decorations.

Party favors

I’ve spent a lot of dough (PUNNY!) on stupid crappy plastic party favors in the past, but I’m really excited about this idea. I made two double batches – one pink, one blue – of sparkle play dough (using this recipe I found on Pinterest), divided each color up into 10 smallish balls, popped them in sandwich bags and stapled on a label. It worked out to pennies per favor and I think they kids will really like it. I also made a triple batch of plain white glitter play dough I’m going to have out with a bunch of plastic cookie cutters for the kids to play with at the party. They’re all going to be COVERED in glitter but I figure then they’ll just match my theme better.

Christmas tree turned into a Caroline tree!

Twinkle picture in action

I figured since the Christmas tree was already prominently featured as part of our decor (because it is a GIANT TREE covered in lights in the middle of the room where we have parties) I should make it more Caroliney for her birthday. I am very conscious of the “My birthday never felt special because it was too close to Christmas” problem EVERYONE I MET told me about when I was pregnant. I dreaded telling people I was due December 26th because they always told me about their mother/brother/cousin/dog who was born that week and has hated it their whole life. My attempt to prevent that feeling in Caroline is why we are having this party at all, so I’m doing my best o make the day ALL ABOUT HER. But really, photos + clothespins on the tree is a cute idea with ANY photos.

Which reminds me I made this:

I crack myself up.

 

DIY Pull String Pinata

I think this is the project I am most excited about. Ever since I saw Young House Love’s party post about their daughter’s 1st birthday I’ve been dying to try making my own pull-string pinata. The idea is a one year old is too young to smack a pinata with a stick (and also hello December birthday in New England, we’re INSIDE, maybe giving kids bats to swing isn’t the best idea) put they can pull a ribbon and have the treats fall out. To make the base, I followed their tutorial here. My original concept was a giant snowball or snowflake but I like how this ended up even better. I just folded coffee filters in half and glued them around with hot glue, overlapping layers.

Close up of the coffee filter petals

My last good idea isn’t so much a really good idea as just a “Why didn’t someone TELL me that before?!” I bought a small glass pitcher at Goodwill to put the cream of coconut in for my grown-up drinks. I figured no one could identify white stuff in a glass pitcher as cream of coconut, so I was just going to write on the glass with a black sharpie and it would be my cream of coconut container FOREVER. But it turns out magic eraser takes permanent marker off of glass super easily.

p.s. I have terrible handwriting

It also worked on clear plastic, which is perfect for my dipping sauces. Regular dry erase would get smudges and illegible as soon as it got dripped on/touched but I tried smudging the sharpie and I can’t.

I’ll try to have a full party recap up on Monday, unless I am so exhausted I end up sleeping straight through Sunday. It’s entirely possible.

Thirty Hand Made Days

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No-Sew Rag Wreath

Monday, June 27th, 2011

I am super proud of this project because for once it WASN’T inspired by something I saw on Pinterest or in a magazine or some other creative person’s blog. It came out of my very own brain, as small and empty as that brain might be.

And don’t go raining on my parade by telling me you wrote a tutorial for the VERY SAME THING back in 1997 when it was ACTUALLY an original idea because WHATEVER DUDE. We are not special snowflakes so just let me have this one, OK? I spend an embarrassing amount of time looking at things on Pinterest and kicking myself and slapping my forehead saying “Why didn’t I think of that?!” So I finally thought of something, which may or may not kind of suck, but as far as I’m concerned is the BEST CRAFT PROJECT EVAR.

No-Sew Rag Wreath Tutorial

Supplies:
Foam wreath form
Thumbtack/map pins
Fabric
Scissors

Because I am lazy, I bought a roll of pre-coordinated fabric strips from the craft store. I think these are meant for quilting but since that is a craft that requires actual skills you won’t find me anywhere near it. You could, of course, use your own fabric just cut into strips, if you were the kind of person who just kept yards and yards of pretty fabrics lying about. I bow to you.

When you unroll your roll, you’ll see there’s two long lengths of each pattern of fabric, folded in half. I started by cutting at the folds, so I had 4 strips of fabric. Then I cut through all 4 pieces at once to make square-ish squares. It’s not rocket science, so don’t get out your protractor or anything. The goal is to cut up a nice big pile of fabric pieces without injuring yourself. IT’S HARDER THAN IT LOOKS. You should see the blister I got on my middle finger from all the cutting.

I am so hard core. A HARD CORE CRAFTER. I’m packing heat! Oh wait, that’s just a glue gun.

I wrapped some extra fabric around my wreath (it took 2 of the full-length strips) because I didn’t plan to decorate the back and I thought it looked a little nicer with the fabric. Pin the ends with a couple of map pins (note: I bought the map pins at Staples in the fastener aisle. They’re just like the pins my mom used to use when she was tacking up a hem to sew but I would bet they’re cheaper when they’re called “map pins”). I alternated my map pins with some large ball thumb tacks in colors that matched my fabric. The tacks didn’t work as well because they were shorter, but add some texture to the finished product.

Now push a pin through the middle of one of your fabric squares into the wreath. Push JUST A LITTLE BIT MORE once you get it all the way in, so the fabric sticks out. Start filling in the wreath with different colored squares. I found it was easier to cover it with a layer and then go back and fill in as needed. After you’re about 3/4 of the way done you’re going to look at it and think “This looks TERRIBLE” but trust me, keep going. Pull the edges of the fabric out so you can pin new pieces close to the old pieces to get that sticky-outy effect.

Originally, I thought they would kind of look like flowers, but because I just cut squares they aren’t especially flower-like. You could use pinking sheers to make the edges ruffly or cut circles of different sizes, but as I’ve mentioned before, I am L to the A to the Z to the Y and nap times are short.

Once you reach the desired fullness level, use two pins to attach a ribbon to the back and hang it up. Check to make sure there aren’t any bald patches and voila, you have a one of a kind rag wreath.

Ta-da!

Thirty Hand Made Days

 

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